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Congrats, Esperenza!


Congrats, Esperenza!

artemisdreaming:

Violins, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1941
Arnold Newman

artemisdreaming:

Violins, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1941

Arnold Newman

blind-io:

Illustrations of Chladni patterns and, in particular, their relevance to violin construction.

When a violin (or, indeed any plate) is made to vibrate at specific frequencies, known as modes, standing waves are set up. By covering the surface with filings or sand, we can view the shape of these waves. The particles will naturally drift towards stationary areas, known as nodes.

Three modes for the violin are shown here, though it has many more. These are used to ensure symmetry and shape precision in the final instrument.

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violins:

Future violin.

violins:

Future violin.

withywindlesdaughter:

A Stradivarius violin kept in a closet for the past 25 years could fetch as much as $10 million next month, Christie’s auction house said Wednesday, in an auction preview in Hong Kong. The instrument was once owned by French musician Rodolphe Kreutzer, one of Europe’s leading concert violinists in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and was crafted in 1731 by famed Italian violin maker Antonio Stradivari. “It’s a magnificent instrument, it’s a great piece of sculpture,” Christie’s international specialist head of musical instruments Kerry Keane said. It has belonged to the family of wealthy 19th-century American entrepreneur and politician William Andrews Clark for almost 100 years.

withywindlesdaughter:

A Stradivarius violin kept in a closet for the past 25 years could fetch as much as $10 million next month, Christie’s auction house said Wednesday, in an auction preview in Hong Kong. The instrument was once owned by French musician Rodolphe Kreutzer, one of Europe’s leading concert violinists in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, and was crafted in 1731 by famed Italian violin maker Antonio Stradivari. “It’s a magnificent instrument, it’s a great piece of sculpture,” Christie’s international specialist head of musical instruments Kerry Keane said. It has belonged to the family of wealthy 19th-century American entrepreneur and politician William Andrews Clark for almost 100 years.

Anonymous said: hey, I think you reblogged a video about a month ago of two violins playing a cover of Toxic...I was wondering if maybe you'd reblog it again, we could really use the exposure before we start launching our own original arrangements. thanks so much! if you're having trouble finding it, you can just search "carson poltorack" on youtube, it should come up

hey anon, I will tag the video to this ask so that our followers will go check it out. Keep up the great work! Can’t wait to see more from you both in future.

Here’s the link guys. Go see their amazing stuff and subscribe to them if you are on Youtube!

Hello,

 
My name is Marina, I represent the Codewise Systems company, the developer of “Cadenza: Tuner+Metronome” app. It’s a highly accurate tuner, a versatile metronome and a pitch pipe, used by more than 350 000 musicians throughout the world.
 
The app is designed for iPhones and iPads. If you are interested, please let us know, so that we can provide promotional codes in order to download the app for free.
 
More information about app: www.goo.gl/ttKNHR
 
Hope you enjoy it.
 
Thank you for your time and consideration.
Best regards,
Spinu Marina
Hey guys! Check this out! 
gregbtracy:

A beautiful Milanese violin

gregbtracy:

A beautiful Milanese violin

yodiscrepo:

Cuerda del violín en slow motion.

yodiscrepo:

Cuerda del violín en slow motion.

darsen:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 
Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.
On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.
The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”
And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:
[stifled giggling]
[reeeeeeally deep breath]
[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]
The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.
In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”
FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of God why would you put it in a tuba part.

And that’s why I went with stringed instruments.

I know this isn’t very related but it is hilarious! enjoy

darsen:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 

Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.

On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.

The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”

And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:

[stifled giggling]

[reeeeeeally deep breath]

[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]

The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.

In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”

FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of God why would you put it in a tuba part.

And that’s why I went with stringed instruments.

I know this isn’t very related but it is hilarious! enjoy

juncurryahn:

오빤 강남스타일~ 

Gangnam Style Dance/Violin Cover!

juncurryahn:

juncurryahn:

Disney’s Frozen “Let It Go” VIOLIN Cover

Let it goooo let it gooooo

azureviolin:

My latest violin!!! Almost four years of love and neglect. It has an even, dark tone and needs to be played in. I can’t wait to start another. Oil varnish, rosewood fittings, Dominant strings.